Updated: 04/05/2019 4:26 PM | Print Story |  Email

4/5 Movie Trip

Paul McGuire Grimes has three good movies for you to see in theaters.

SHAZAM! (in theaters)

The wizard council is destined to find one soul worthy of becoming the next grand high wizard to save the planet from destruction against the seven deadly sins. Decades pass before they find a young kid who’s pure in heart and soul. That just happens to be fourteen-year-old Billy Batson. He’s led a complicated life running from one foster home to the next in search of his birth mom. Just as he arrives at the home of a new foster family, he finds himself transported to another world and given the powers of the superhero by the current grand wizard. Back on Earth, Billy finds that when he says the word “Shazam!” he morphs into the body of an adult superhero. His foster brother, Freddy, is obsessed with superheros and teaches Billy how to use the new powers he finds himself wielding. Hot on his heels is our token villain, Dr. Thaddeus Sivana, and his seven deadly sins who come in the form of gargoyle monsters.

Is It Worth Your Trip to the Movies? There’s potential with this character but this film is not as clever or self-aware as it could be. 

RATING: 2.5 out of 5 TICKET STUBS

THE BEST OF ENEMIES (in theaters)

In 1971 North Carolina, the town of Durham became the subject of a heated discussion over school segregation. A fire broke out at a local elementary school for black students. It’s a bit unclear who started it but signs point to the local chapter of the KKK. There are two options at hand. One is for the students to finish the school year trading off time in the remaining rooms unaffected or integrate at the school used predominately by white students. When the city officials declare the students remain studying in the burned down hallways of their school, the NAACP gets involved to sue the city. A two-week meeting, called a charrette, is held to open up the conversation in hopes of voting yes to end the segregation of the schools. The two co-chairs of the meeting are Ann Atwater, a local civil rights activist who’s pitted against C.P. Ellis, the head of the local chapter of the KKK.

RATING: 3 out of 5 TICKET STUBS

PET SEMATARY (in theaters)

Louis Creed and his wife Rachel move their family from Boston to Ludlow, Maine when he gets a new job as a physician. Their new home causes Rachel some PTSD regarding the death of her sister. Their daughter, Ellie, discovers an animal burial ground just down the road from their new home. It’s used by the local kids who named it the “Pet Sematary,” hence the misspelling. Judd Crandall, the Creed’s lone neighbor, is a bit grizzly and knows all about the town’s history regarding this cemetery. Louis learns quickly that the dead don’t stay buried when their cat, Church, comes back from the dead to terrorize their family. Church isn’t the only member of the Creed family to haunt them. Death continues to follow them haunting them in more ways than one.

regarding the death of our loved ones. There are questions as to how we talk to our children about death and the appropriate language to use.

Is It Worth Your Trip to the Movies? King fans should be pleased.

RATING: 3.5 out of 5 TICKET STUBS